Toilet Twinning Project: flushing away poverty

Community Group Hopes to be Flushed with Success

A Darlington community group is hoping to help flush away poverty and illness – one toilet at a time.

Darlington Rotary have signed up to scheme run by the national Toilet Twinning registered charity which enables individuals, organisations and companies to twin their loos with ones in the developing world.

Clean water, hygiene and toilets are significant factors in the battle again Covid-19 in poorer countries across the globe.

Chair of Darlington Rotary’s International Committee, Jane Bradshaw, said: ‘By donating £60 to twin your toilet, you help fund a project in a poor community that will enable families to build a basic toilet, have access to clean water and learn about hygiene – a vital combination that saves lives.

‘When you twin, you are sent a certificate to hang in your loo – showing a photograph of your overseas toilet twin and GPS coordinates so you can look up your twin’s location on Google Maps.’
Jane said that individuals in Darlington Rotary’s 80 strong group would be taking part, but it was hoped that other organisations, companies, restaurants and bars and other firms would join them.

‘We would like to start a drive in Darlington that will make a difference to many who currently don’t have access to clean toilets, which means they are much more vulnerable to diseases and viruses like Covid-19.’

Information about the charity can be found on https://www.toilettwinning.org/ and Jane asks that participants let Darlington Rotary know when they have signed up by emailing a picture of their certificates to dtonrotary@gmail.com.

‘We would like to get to 100 toilet twins and publish a gallery of the certificates on our website https://www.darlingtonrotary.org/ to publicise the commitment of those who take part.

‘That would mean that £6,000 will have been donated to what is a crucial part of the fight again Covid-19.’

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Pic - Rotn Jane Bradshaw with her toilet twinning certificate

Toilet Twinning Project: flushing away poverty